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THE WHITE SHIPS

NEW WEBSITE COMING SOON!

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Aloha & Welcome to The White Ships!

This website is dedicated to preserving the memory of the six beloved Matson passenger liners that sailed between California, Hawaiʻi and the South Seas from 1927 until 1978.

Matson Navigation's construction and operation of the white ships changed the course of history for the people of the United States, Hawaiʻi, the South Pacific, New Zealand, and Australia. Crossing vast, historic Pacific trade routes for five decades, the Matson fleet survived the Great Depression and World War 2. Their legendary service and innovation was the envy of the shipping world. They carried a mix of tourists, migrants, and business people in a comfort and style that redefined ocean travel. 

The lasting influence of the white ships remains strong in their historic ports of call, and they continue to be a source of great nostalgia for those who remember the "Grand Manner of Matson" and the romantic era of steamship travel. 

 

The white ships' enduring legacy is also a testament to the strength of American maritime industry in the twentieth century, which Matson continues to represent today with their U.S.-flagged trans-Pacific container service. 

Created by Duncan OʻBrien, whose parents met on the S.S. Monterey in 1962, the new whiteships.com will become the "home port" for online content related to the Matson passenger ship era.

 

The site will feature the finest and most spectacular items from Duncan's collection of images, films, artwork and memorabilia, acquired during two decades of research for his three books: The White Ships (2009), Matson the Mouse (2012), and The Grand Manner of Matson (2014). 

And there's more to come! Stay tuned for news about the next chapter of the Matson Lines passenger ship history, as we continue to keep the Grand Manner afloat. Check our Facebook feed below for the latest. Mahalo for visiting!

MALOLO • MARIPOSA • MONTEREY • MATSONIA • LURLINE

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